CBD hemp oil is the product derived from the hemp plant, which is high in CBD (cannabidiol) and low in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). This oil has received a large amount of attention in recent years, due to the growing wave of marijuana legislation and debate in many countries, including the United States. While cannabis and smoking marijuana (which often has a high level of the psychotropic compound THC) is still illegal in many places, as more is being learned about CBD, and its potential effects on health, it is becoming more and more accepted as a legal and safe remedy for a wide variety of health conditions. Since it has a minimal amount of the psychotropic compound THC, use of this oil does not result in a traditional “high”, so its effects are generally considered therapeutic, not mind-altering.
CBD hemp oil has a number of uses and comes in many forms including capsules, tinctures, sublingual supplements, liquid oil, oil as a paste, sprays, salves, creams and in edible forms, such as candies or sweets. You can also inhale CBD oil from vapor-releasing pens, similar to the technology for e-cigarettes. This variety also provides a lot of controlled flexibility in terms of concentration, making CBD hemp oil useful and desirable for people of all ages, economic means, and personal needs.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your healthcare provider or 911 immediately. Any mention of products or services is not meant as a guarantee, endorsement, or recommendation of the products, services, or companies. Reliance on any information provided is solely at your own risk. Please discuss any options with your healthcare provider.

The science behind CBD is in the relatively early stages. As a cannabinoid, we know that CBD interacts with receptors in your endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is integrated throughout your body — and this widespread, whole-body interaction creates a broad range of effects. Hence, the long list of possible benefits.   We may still be in the early stages of discovery, but there’s plenty of scientific studies and anecdotal evidence that CBD provides relief for an array of ailments. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of some potential benefits of CBD oil:
It is thought that by applying the correct amount of cannabis, the cannabinoids can help with the promotion of lipids which help fight chronic skin conditions including acne and psoriasis. Some also claim that cannabis oil has the power to remove wrinkles and skin spots. While we wouldn’t bank on it being the “anti-aging” miracle, it is helping millions of people worldwide deal with a variety of skin diseases including eczema and rosacea.
Take a look at our CBD oil dosage chart recommendation to determine what’s the best dose for your situation. Generally speaking, take 1 to 6 mg of CBD Oil for every 10 lbs of your body. If you are between 100 and 175 lbs, 6 to 8 mg may be right for mild pain, 18 to 24 mg for medium pain and 32 to 60 mg for severe pain. Remember, start on the lower side, and go up gradually overtime.

Side effects of CBD include nausea, fatigue and irritability. CBD can increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does. A significant safety concern with CBD is that it is primarily marketed and sold as a supplement, not a medication. Currently, the FDA does not regulate the safety and purity of dietary supplements. So you cannot know for sure that the product you buy has active ingredients at the dose listed on the label. In addition, the product may contain other (unknown) elements. We also don’t know the most effective therapeutic dose of CBD for any particular medical condition.
As a result, customers can now be confident that most companies out there are pretty legitimate in terms of the overall safety of their products. However, you should still keep your eyes peeled and do as much research as possible, as a lot of brands are still selling non-therapeutic hemp seed oils as “CBD oils,” when in fact they contain very little of the active compound at all.
For example, both CBD and THC affect the body’s endocannabinoid system and thus provide relief for many of the same conditions. CBD is used for more “serious ailments.” Including but not limited to seizures, psychosis or mental disorders and inflammatory bowel disease. The reason for that is that CBD doesn’t get you “high.” In fact, it would be impossible for a person to get high while using CBD because as we said above, it interferes with the CB1 receptors.
A number of difficulties exist in evaluating published data on CBD or marijuana use for epilepsy. The extremely limited published studies were small, poorly described, and not well designed. Contributing to the difficulty of interpreting published studies, CBD products are not produced under the guidance of good manufacturing practices (GMP) and are not subject to regulations governing labeling, purity, and reliability. In other words, currently, there is no guarantee of consistency between products, or even differing lots produced by the same manufacturer. Without independent testing (e.g. USP certification) of CBD products for content and purity, as well as bioavailability testing of specific products, uncertainty surrounds the use of available CBD products in routine clinical settings.
Improving the appearance of the skin, especially reducing the signs and symptoms of acne and eczema, are the great benefits of regular CBD oil use. Topical application is quite popular for this, whether in a diluted or undiluted form, depending on the severity of the skin affliction. The powerful anti-inflammatory properties of the oil can also soothe redness, itchiness, and swollen areas of the skin.
Prescription opioids, such as codeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, fentanyl, and morphine are medications that are naturally found in the opium poppy plant. Besides relieving pain, they can make you relaxed and high. The problem is that opioids are highly addictive, and overuse and death are incredibly common as a result of opioids. This is true for prescription opioids, and people taking prescription opioids may become addicted and suffer from consequences. Yet doctors are still commonly prescribing opiods even in less serious cases (17).

 If you have to administer CBD to a child or a beginner, perhaps the best way to do that is to swallow the oil. Consuming the oil will activate the digestive system, metabolize in the liver, and then it will enter the bloodstream. The same process happens when you take vitamins.  You can also mix it with juice, loaves and any other food products if you want.
Deciding to use CBD oil as a natural therapy is one thing – figuring out which brand to use, what strength/concentration to use, and how much CBD to actually take is another thing altogether. Plus, with all of the products out there to choose from and their confusing mL/mg labels, it can be a nightmare trying to determine which one is best for you, or which one you should be taking for your specific condition.
When administered alone, CBD is an effective anticonvulsant in maximal electrical shock (MES), magnesium-free, 4-aminopyridine, and audiogenic models (7, 8). Co-administration with AEDs leads to various effects; anticonvulsant effects of CBD are enhanced with phenytoin or phenobarbital but decreased with chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, trimethadione, and ethosuximide. In a recent study using an acute pilocarpine model, although CBD administration reduced the number of animals displaying seizure activity, CBD did not appear to have any significant effect on the number of seizures per animal (7).
Warning: It IS possible to take too much CBD oil. While you cannot fatally overdose on CBD and there are very few negative side effects, too much has been shown to cause drowsiness, lethargy, upset stomach, nausea and diarrhea. The exact amounts that lead to these side effects are unknown, which is why you should start with small amounts and slowly increase the dose over time until you experience your desired result. (1)
To my understanding, neither CBD nor THC are effective for “severe” pain; rather, they work better for mild to moderate chronic pain. Often, with severe pain, the dosage of opiates can be decreased with concomitant use of medical cannabis or CBD and that decrease in dose makes their use safer. Concurrent use of THC does increase the analgesic effect of CBD, but it also adds the “high” which some people do not want as a side effect.
I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?
1. Devinsky O, Cilio MR, Cross H, Fernandez-Ruiz J, French J, Hill C, Katz R, Di Marzo V, Jutras-Aswad D, Notcutt WG, Martinez-Orgado J, Robson PJ, Rohrback BG, Thiele E, Whalley B, Friedman D. Cannabidiol: Pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Epilepsia. 2014;55:791–802. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition.
Dr. Cohen has found that chronic conditions including autoimmune diseases and pain syndromes can be helped with a 6-mg under-the-tongue tincture (the fastest delivery system) or a 25-mg capsule taken twice a day. Dosages for topical products like lotions are especially hard to determine—there’s no clarity on how much CBD gets into the system through the skin.

Today you can find an array of  products that contain cannabidiol.  Oil, balm, gummies, ointments, sleeping pills, and capsules are all common products on the market. CBD oil is made by extracting the CBD from the plant (marijuana or hemp), and then diluting it with a carrier oil – coconut or hemp seed oil. It is used for reducing pain, anxiety and depression, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, acne and other conditions.
Take a look at our CBD oil dosage chart recommendation to determine what’s the best dose for your situation. Generally speaking, take 1 to 6 mg of CBD Oil for every 10 lbs of your body. If you are between 100 and 175 lbs, 6 to 8 mg may be right for mild pain, 18 to 24 mg for medium pain and 32 to 60 mg for severe pain. Remember, start on the lower side, and go up gradually overtime.
Because CBD works with specific neurotransmitters to reduce anxiety and increase the ability to focus, initial studies have shown promise in its ability to increase the quality of life by decreasing the symptoms of ADHD for many sufferers. Much of this research is still in the early phases (with a lot of room to learn more), however, CBD may be worth adding to a daily routine for those frustrated with traditional treatment options.
CO2 extraction is one of the most common ways CBD is extracted from the hemp or cannabis plants. This method uses expensive equipment that adjusts temperature and pressure to extract the cannabinoids from the plant material, without damaging them. The other common method is to use solvents like ethanol or butane to extract the plant material. These solvents have to be burned off the final product which may damage the cannabinoids or terpenes in the process. There is also a risk that these solvents may not have burned off completely and could end up in your end product.
Gloss and Vickrey conducted a Cochrane systematic review of the use of CBD in the treatment of epilepsy (11). Their methodology included only those trials that were randomized and controlled and excluded case series, case reports, and expert opinion. They were able to identify only 4 randomized controlled studies reported in the literature, and they included a letter to the editor and an abstract. The total number of subjects enrolled in these studies was 48 (11–14). While only four studies and a letter to the editor were in the actual analysis, the authors included a complete reference listing of all articles reviewed for inclusion.
In addition to all the benefits we’ve already discussed, CBD has been proven to have antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. This means that it helps repair the damage from oxidative stress, which is believed to be a primary cause of diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS — even heart disorders and some forms of cancer. This is a hugely beneficial effect of CBD.
I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?
All of the product reviews listed on this website are real reviews from real users. Recommended brands are selected solely based on merit. Our vetting process includes analysis of product quality based on third party lab reports, customer service quality and responsiveness, industry reputation, company longevity and customer feedback. Per FTC guidelines, we do participate in the affiliate programs of some but not all of the recommended brands whereby we receive a small commission on purchases made through links on this website. Any references to third party products, prices or websites referenced in this group are subject to change without notice.
After consulting with Amanda Chantal Bacon of Moon Juice, I decided to invest in a bottle of Gone Green Hemp CBD Oil in the 500mg tincture. Gone Green is a really incredible company that only sources the best herbs, adaptogens, and superfoods, so I knew I would be getting a very high-quality product when I grabbed their bottle off of Moon Juice’s shelf. You can buy Gone Green’s Hemp CBD Oil online—it’s 100% legal in all 50 states. They have the best customer service ever, and they carry tons of other fantastic products that any health-conscious person would love!
From what I understand, CBD derived from the hemp plant does not have the side effects mentioned above, other than possibly to help reduce the amount of Coumadin/Warfarin needed – either way, a patient on this drug needs to be monitored and regularly tested anyway with their doctor. CBD derived from the marijuana plant (will contain THC) may have them, I do not know, maybe that’s why you mention them. One of the many reasons people take Hemp CBD is that it does NOT have the side effects! People take the Hemp version to help with feelings of fatigue, irritability & anxiousness, it does cause it! It helps to bring the body into balance.
The inability to obtain quality sleep doesn’t just lead to tiresome days; it can impact regular functioning. Each year, numerous individuals make life altering mistakes on the job, in vehicles and more, leading to fatalities. In the medical field, sleep deprivation among practitioners may be responsible for up to 100,000 deaths in the United States.
×