Apply CBD oil topically if you have localized pain. Look online for CBD topical skin creams if you live where it’s legal. The container will likely only display the total amount of CBD that’s in the product, so there’s no need to measure out a specific dosage. Simply use your finger to scoop up enough of the product to cover the area of skin you want to treat and rub it in really well.[4]
I have been sick with type 2 diebetic problems since 1997 and I just started to use cbd oil in a vape pen in 2018 I found that it really works well for controlling severe foot nerve pain and I can stop with the symbalta for nerve pain that has very bad side effects on me I also have hart problems with 2 stents put in I don’t know yet what will happen with the hart issues but waiting to see I do know I have been a calmer person not as aggressive like I used to be with less stress and pain and hyper aggressive violent attitude has went way down which was one of the symbalta side affects since I’m not depressed which what symbalta was made for but works also for nerve pain for diebetics but for me has reversed affects and makes me depressed and bad tude so all in all I’m sticking with the cbd oil I don’t know about future affects from use but like everything else theres al ways some kind of affect but I’m thinking this way is still better than hands full of pills every day that damage your liver and kidneys I’m not saying to stop your meds just the few that become not needed and replaced by the oil still have to take my shots to control sugar maybe one day big pharma will let the cure out but I will not hold my breath on that one haha so far so good have to see what the future brings take care all and do your research john

According to the National Cancer Institute, over 38 percent of people will be diagnosed with one type of cancer or another at some point in their lives. While standard treatments – like medication, chemotherapy, radiation and various surgeries – have come a long way, there may be natural options to further the effectiveness of these drugs, or to provide an entire set of other benefits. (10) 

The science behind CBD is in the relatively early stages. As a cannabinoid, we know that CBD interacts with receptors in your endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is integrated throughout your body — and this widespread, whole-body interaction creates a broad range of effects. Hence, the long list of possible benefits.   We may still be in the early stages of discovery, but there’s plenty of scientific studies and anecdotal evidence that CBD provides relief for an array of ailments. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of some potential benefits of CBD oil:
CBD may offer an option for treating different types of chronic pain. A study from the European Journal of Pain showed, using an animal model, CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Another study demonstrated the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of chronic pain to treat. More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate the claims of CBD proponents about pain control.
Consume CBD oil if you want to quit smoking cigarettes. While consuming CBD oil, people sometimes report craving nicotine less. Withdrawal symptoms like anxiety and mood swings also aren’t as severe for many people when they take CBD oil. If you’re struggling to quit smoking cigarettes, try using CBD oil to potentially diminish your cravings and withdrawal symptoms.[13]
CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

At this time, there does seem to be a growing body of basic pharmacologic data suggesting there may be a role for CBD, especially in the treatment of refractory epilepsy. However, given the lack of well-controlled trials, we must also ask if we are getting ahead of ourselves. Clearly, this is an emotionally and politically charged issue. If this were any other uninvestigated pharmaceutical compound, would we feel as compelled to make the agent widely available before statistically valid class 1 evidence was available for review? Until data from well-designed clinical trials are available and reliable, and standardized CBD products that are produced using GMP are available, caution must be exercised in any consideration of using CBD for the treatment of epilepsy. In the meantime, based upon promising preliminary data, further clinical research should be wholeheartedly pursued.


However, before the villainization of hemp, it was widely accepted as a very useful plant (3). From biofuel from its seeds to medicine from its leaves, it ought to be a core crop grown by farmers across the United States and beyond. However, for reasons too numerous to discuss in this article, issues of legality and federal restrictions have put a stop to that idea for the time being.

CBD is one of over 60 compounds found in cannabis that belong to a class of ingredients called cannabinoids. Until recently, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) was getting most of the attention because it’s the ingredient in cannabis that produces intoxicating effects in users. But CBD is also present in high concentrations — and the world is awakening to its possible benefits.


If you live in a state where CBD is legal for your condition, it’s best to buy it from a state-regulated dispensary. But even there, oversight is uneven. “I feel safe being a cannabis consumer in Colorado, since the state tracks everything from seed to sale, but I didn’t the first few years after cannabis became legal,” when the rules were still taking shape, says Robyn Griggs Lawrence, the Boulder author of The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook, which features recipes for cannabis edibles.

Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19th century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1).


Prescription opioids, such as codeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, fentanyl, and morphine are medications that are naturally found in the opium poppy plant. Besides relieving pain, they can make you relaxed and high. The problem is that opioids are highly addictive, and overuse and death are incredibly common as a result of opioids. This is true for prescription opioids, and people taking prescription opioids may become addicted and suffer from consequences. Yet doctors are still commonly prescribing opiods even in less serious cases (17).
The interest and preference for botanical remedies such as CBD oil over harsh pharmaceuticals are growing rapidly. You can read scientific research on the promise of CBD Oil at NCBI. While North America is taking the lead legalizing cannabis and hemp the rest of the world is starting to question their stance on prohibition because of the undeniable benefits. While all talk about plant-based remedies may seem very new, using cannabis/hemp tinctures as a holistic remedy is a generations-old tradition. It was very common to use tinctures of cannabis oil in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We are enjoying a renaissance in ancestral health where we are open again to remedies that were all but forgotten about in the mad race to make medicines a pill offered by a faceless often unaccountable corporation.
A survey of patients seen in a tertiary epilepsy center found that 21% of patients admitted to using marijuana in the last year, and 24% of patients believed marijuana to be effective for their seizures (10). While interesting, this anecdotal observation does not rise to the level of evidence needed to evaluate a potential new therapeutic modality.
×