CBD affects the endocannabinoid system, which has cannabinoid receptors throughout the human body. That’s one of the major reasons why CBD’s therapeutic properties include pain relief. The cannabinoid receptors are connected to the human nervous system.  CBD affects some of them (not CB1 and CB2 which are activated by THC) and a  neural connection is triggered in the brain.
Although several clinical studies focused on the health effects of CBD, the results available so far were not enough to convince the FDA to approve it as a drug. The FDA does not agree with its use as a dietary supplement either, but as long as sellers publish the appropriate disclaimers (like those on the CBDPure website and labels), it’s not up to them.
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“Buying from a reputable manufacturer is crucial, because it matters how the plant is cultivated and processed,” Dr. Maroon says. One clue that a company is cutting corners: too low a cost. Good CBD is pricey—a bottle of high-quality capsules is sold in Cohen’s office for $140. But for many, it’s worth the money. Roth spent $60 on her tiny bottle. But when her energy returned the day she started taking CBD, she decided that was a small price to pay.
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