Cannabis has always been a popular form of treatment for a variety of medical conditions, but in the 1930’s growing concerns about the dangers of marijuana abuse led to cannabinoids being banned. A century has past and despite all efforts from cannabis enthusiasts through social media channels and online media, cannabis is still classed as a schedule 1 drug.
In your internet travels, you may also come across products called “terpsolates.” The manufacturers of these products infuse CBD Isolate with terpenes (but not cannabinoids like THC). These terpenes may enhance the effectiveness of CBD — or maybe they just make it smell good. This may be a good place to point out that not all CBD products are created equal. The industry is still largely unregulated, and the quality and quantity of CBD in a given product will vary wildly. Third-party testing definitely helps to monitor companies’ claims, but it’s still up to you as the consumer to do your homework on the best CBD products.
Scientists have identified 113 cannabinoids in hemp plants.  CBD (cannabidiol) is one of them. CBD is a phytocannabinoid that makes up almost 40% of the plant’s extract, and it’s one of the most active substances derived from it. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) for comparison is derived from the marijuana plant, and it is the most active substance derived from it.
CBD Vape Oil is very popular and can be used with a suitable vaporizer. Since this oil is generally viscous, it needs a device that can work with it. Therefore, it cannot be used with all vaporizers. Make sure you have a suitable vaporizer before using a CBD vape oil. CBD Vape oils have different concentrations and flavors. Adding terpenes also contributes to the effect.
Gloss and Vickrey conducted a Cochrane systematic review of the use of CBD in the treatment of epilepsy (11). Their methodology included only those trials that were randomized and controlled and excluded case series, case reports, and expert opinion. They were able to identify only 4 randomized controlled studies reported in the literature, and they included a letter to the editor and an abstract. The total number of subjects enrolled in these studies was 48 (11–14). While only four studies and a letter to the editor were in the actual analysis, the authors included a complete reference listing of all articles reviewed for inclusion.
A common misconception we hear is “cannabinoids from hemp are not as good as cannabinoids from cannabis.” This statement is arguably confusing; hemp is cannabis, just like all the other strains that fall under the cannabis species. They variations of cannabinoids they can contain are endless — you never know what they have until the oil is extracted and tested. Our properly sourced hemp oil is rich in their proprietary cannabinoid blend and is 3rd party lab tested to verify cannabinoid potency and to check for any contaminants.
Generally, CBD oil is made by combining an extract with a carrier fluid or oil. This question is best answered by looking at how the CBD oil was extracted. CBD oil can be extracted using CO2 systems or by using chemical solvents. Both methods produce a CBD oil byproduct that is then combined with a fluid like MCT oil, coconut oil, or olive oil so that it can be delivered to the body. Always check to make sure you know the CBD content of the products you purchase.
Other targets for CBD include transient receptor potential (TRP) channels that are involved with the modulation of intracellular calcium (1, 6). Cannabinoids are highly lipophilic, allowing access to intracellular sites of action, resulting in increases in calcium in a variety of cell types including hippocampal neurons. CBD actions on calcium homeostasis may provide a basis for CBD neuroprotective properties.
Other targets for CBD include transient receptor potential (TRP) channels that are involved with the modulation of intracellular calcium (1, 6). Cannabinoids are highly lipophilic, allowing access to intracellular sites of action, resulting in increases in calcium in a variety of cell types including hippocampal neurons. CBD actions on calcium homeostasis may provide a basis for CBD neuroprotective properties.
CBD may be best known for its relaxing, calming effects. CBD reduces autonomic arousal, having the inverse effect of THC on the body. CBD’s anti-anxiety effect is why many in the cannabis community talk about how CBD relieves paranoia, although that is not scientifically proven yet. CBD is also known for its anti-nausea and pain relieving effects. It really depends on why your body’s specific needs and the quantity in which you take CBD.

For example, both CBD and THC affect the body’s endocannabinoid system and thus provide relief for many of the same conditions. CBD is used for more “serious ailments.” Including but not limited to seizures, psychosis or mental disorders and inflammatory bowel disease. The reason for that is that CBD doesn’t get you “high.” In fact, it would be impossible for a person to get high while using CBD because as we said above, it interferes with the CB1 receptors.
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