At present, we have the following classification of cannabinoids: endocannabinoids (produced naturally in the body, mainly from fatty acid precursors), phytocannabinoids (compounds that have a plant origin, with the cannabis plant being the best-studied source of phytocannabinoids though not the only one), and artificial cannabinoids (created while studying THC, to garner the benefits of marijuana without the recreational component).
Scientists have identified 113 cannabinoids in hemp plants.  CBD (cannabidiol) is one of them. CBD is a phytocannabinoid that makes up almost 40% of the plant’s extract, and it’s one of the most active substances derived from it. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) for comparison is derived from the marijuana plant, and it is the most active substance derived from it.
I have read about studies from Europe (not very specific I know) that suggest CBD might work better for some people if combined with some level of THC. Also, the getting high part can be helpful, although not for everybody, of course. A second point – I don’t hear very much about CBD eliminating or almost eliminating pain for people with severe pain. Helpful, but, so far at least, it doesn’t seem that CBDs can replace opioids or substantially reduce pain for all chronic pain patients. Maybe someday.
One brand of CBD oil I fully trust and highly recommend to my patients, readers, friends, and family is Rooted Apothecary. They are committed to creating a piece of the puzzle towards a better, healthier life for you and your family. Their products are full spectrum hemp extract grown with love on an organic farm in Colorado, and they are independently tested to ensure safety and quality.
Unlike NSAIDs, many doctors believe that acetaminophen does not increase your risk of stomach or heart issues. They are often recommended to those whose stomach cannot tolerate NSAIDs well. However, acetaminophen is far from ideal for your body. The long-term use and overuse of acetaminophen have been linked to liver problems and acute liver failure.
Everything you need to know about CBD oil CBD oil may offer a range of benefits, including reducing pain and inflammation. Evidence shows that the oil does not contain psychoactive properties and so does not have the same effects as marijuana. Here, learn more about CBD oil and its uses, benefits, and risks. We also discuss its legality in the U.S. Read now

The amount of milligrams of CBD you should take depends on your specific reason for taking CBD. If you are using CBD to treat chronic pain, you might take a much higher dose than someone who would be using CBD for general wellness reasons. Google search for your specific condition or reason for taking CBD to find the dose that is appropriate for you. You can take CBD in high qualities, so feel free to test out different dosages and see how your body reacts. A standard dose of CBD is 10 mg once a day, but this varies so widely because each individual is different so this can’t be taken as a recommendation for you.
That leaves those touting CBD’s effectiveness pointing primarily to research in mice and petri dishes. There, CBD (sometimes combined with small amounts of THC) has shown promise for helping pain, neurological conditions like anxiety and PTSD, and the immune system—and therefore potentially arthritis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and more.
Realistically, you’re going to be looking at a minimum dose of about 40mg CBD if you want to feel effects, at least that’s in my experience. That said, I’ve noticed that dosing can be kind of sensitive – if I take over about 80mg, it seems to start effecting me negatively while a 40-50 mg dose works wonders for me joint pain and sleep. Just my two cents. Best of luck
THC does typically come with a long list of health benefits, but the clinical use of this cannabis compound is often limited by its unwanted psychoactive side effects in people. For this reason, interest in non-intoxicating phytocannabinoids, such as CBD, has substantially increased in recent years. In fact, CBD is being used in conjunction with THC for more favorable effects.
For example, both CBD and THC affect the body’s endocannabinoid system and thus provide relief for many of the same conditions. CBD is used for more “serious ailments.” Including but not limited to seizures, psychosis or mental disorders and inflammatory bowel disease. The reason for that is that CBD doesn’t get you “high.” In fact, it would be impossible for a person to get high while using CBD because as we said above, it interferes with the CB1 receptors.
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